Tips in Posing: Chin and Arms

This week we are covering two posing techniques for more “flattering” images. Two common areas of concern are the chin and arms. Of course, we can photoshop away most of these concerns later, but this can be done only to a certain degree. The more we have to work with from the original image. . . the better.

With that said, we are going to go over some quick tips and some video that will change the way you pose forever. These really are 2 important tips that will make a substantial change in how you photograph.

Bear in mind that we are talking about general people here. If you happen to have the physique of a greek god or goddess, then you probably will only reap a small benefit from these tips. But for the rest of us, these tips will go a long way toward getting the images that we really want.


The Chin

Almost all of us get this at one time or another. The dreaded double chin shot. Or at the very least, an undefined jawline that leads to a less than flattering image.

How can this be avoided you ask? A very simple technique. In modeling, it’s called “turtling”. You simply push your forehead forward and down slightly. This will of course feel a little unnatural at first. But no worries. With a little direction from your photographer, the seemingly unnatural look will quickly become fantastic in camera. 

A great example of how this is done is given by Peter Hurley in the video below. Peter Hurley is on of the most famous and respected headshot photographers in the world. This video is approximately 15 minutes long, but it will be a well spent 15 minutes.



Follow these instructions, and you will be well on your way to getting a well defined jawline and the flattering images that you always really wanted.




The Arms

Then there are the arms. Ever wonder why arms sometimes look a little “chubbier” in photos than in reality? One simple reason. Because if the arm is laying flat against the body, it will squish the arm out and consequently make the arm look larger. 

The fix to this problem is to always keep a gap between your arm and your body. This will immediately thin out the arms. It’s really that simple. As an added benefit, this creates a compositionally pleasing image of the body. When there is space between limbs such as the arms and the body, there is added definition that is pleasing to the mind, which will make your images all the better. This of course also leads to methods of posing legs as well, but that will be saved for another time.


Comments